Authors

Madelyn van der Hoogt

Madelyn van der Hoogt
Editor Emerita

Madelyn van der Hoogt fell in love with weaving in Guatemala in the 1970s, where she lived for a year and learned to weave on a backstrap loom. She’s  been weaving ever since. She can’t choose a favorite among the three activities she loves most: weaving, writing about weaving, and teaching others to weave. A graduate of UC Berkeley, she taught high school English in Oakland, California, for ten years and then continued teaching high school English to subsidize her back-to-the-land years in rural Missouri. There, she founded The Weavers’ School, bringing weaving students to Missouri from all over the world. She is the author of The Complete Book of Drafting for Handweavers and she continues to teach classes at The Weaver’s School, now in Coupeville, Washington. After editing Weaver’s Magazine for thirteen years, she became editor of Handwoven in 1999. She   retired from Handwoven at the end of 2011 with plans to "weave more, write more, and teach more."  Lucky for us, part of Madelyn's "write more" plans include writing for Handwoven and Weaving Today.

Anita Osterhaug

Anita Osterhaug
Editor
In Chief

Anita Osterhaug is the editor of Handwoven magazine and the editor of Weaving Today. She has been devoted to all things fiber since her first embroidery project at age eight. While studying history at Reed College, it dawned on her that knitting produced things to wear, and a yarn stash was born. In parallel with her writing career, her historical interests, neo-Luddite tendencies, and fiber-mania led her to learn handspinning and weaving. From tapestry to twill, she loves every aspect of weaving and fiber. When not weaving, spinning, or knitting, she can be found writing or reading about, teaching, or demonstrating fiber arts. She lives in Hillsboro, Oregon with husband, critters, and a slightly embarrassing array of looms, spinning wheels, and other fiber accoutrements.

 

 

Christina Garton
Assistant Editor

Christina Garton was introduced to weaving by a history professor and later fell even more in love with it while working at an agricultural museum in New Mexico. Surrounded by sheep, goats, weavers, spinners, and immensely talented fiber artists it was only a matter of time before she took her first weaving class. She is now a decidedly novice weaver who also loves to sew and felt. As a historian she also enjoys reading about the history of textile creation and fashion history. Christina lives in beautiful Colorado, where when she’s not playing with fiber, she prefers to be off in the mountains hiking with her husband and terrier.

 

Linda Ligon

Linda Ligon
Founder and Creative Director

Linda Ligon started Interweave Press on her dining room table in Loveland, Colorado, in 1975 when her third child was born. Linda is the founder of Handwoven®, Spin-Off®, Interweave Knits®, Piecework®, and Beadwork® magazines. Her publishing company grew from a small regional magazine to five craft magazines and more than 150 books in print, and from that home-based sole proprietorship to a corporation with more than 75 employees by the time she sold it to Aspire Media in 2005. She has also launched and divested magazines in the realms of herb gardening and cooking, alternative medicine, and sustainable home design. Linda has remained at Interweave as Creative Director and member of the Board of Directors. She keeps (and uses) a spinning wheel in her office to remember what this business is all about.

 

Linda Ligon

Karen Donde

Karen’s fascination with weaving began in Southern New Jersey in 1998 with a newspaper picture of a friendly looking woman weaving on a huge loom. Having sewed since junior high, and having developed an almost unhealthy obsession with fabric, Karen had one of those “aha” moments. Within a week, she was sitting at the same loom she’d seen in the picture with the truly friendly woman who would become her teacher, mentor and close friend handing her a shuttle. She threw three picks and never looked back.

She studied weaving for two years with Naomi, before being invited to join Naomi’s regular Thursday weaving class at South Jersey legend Doris Boyd’s house. Like most of Doris’ students, Karen claimed a loom and didn’t leave, weaving with Doris and the “Thursday girls” for the next nine years. Along the way, she became leader of the South Jersey Guild of Spinners & Handweavers, served on the board of the Mid-Atlantic Fiber Association and attended numerous guild workshops and conferences. A three-year self-study program earned her the Handweaving Guild of America’s Certificate of Excellence in Handweaving: Level I in 2008.In 2004, Karen began teaching weaving and found the only thing more rewarding than pulling a piece of finished cloth off the loom is watching a student do the same. In an effort to stay two steps ahead of her students at Sutherland, Karen enrolled in the Professional Crafts-Fiber program at Haywood Community College, near Asheville, in 2010.

A journalist and freelance writer in her pre-weaving life, Karen has had nine articles published in Handwoven since 2006. Karen’s two grown sons and wonderful husband remain supportive of her weaving addiction, even if she does catch them rolling their eyes when she has prattled on about warps and wefts just a little too long.

Pattie Graver

Pattie Graver

Pattie Graver played with handspinning and knitting for a few years before finding out that her first love in the fiber world is handweaving. She sincerely does not understand why everyone doesn't weave. When she isn't at her loom, she is on her yoga mat, traveling, or smiling at thoughts of her sweet grandchildren. Pattie lives in Loveland, Colorado with her husband and several looms.