Reading the draft

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Anne-grethe wrote
on 15 Apr 2012 12:46 PM

I have just purchased a 8 harnass table loom and have just started weaving on it.  I am confused as to how I would read the draft for the weave when I don't have treadles Stick out tongue I'm sure its very simple but I can't seem to wrap my head around it.  Can anyone explain it  simply

Thanks

Confused newbie Smile

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Lynn Tedder wrote
on 15 Apr 2012 8:00 PM

Hi Anne-grethe,

The tie-up in a standard draft tells you which and how many shafts each treadle is going to raise to make its shed opening, and the treadling tells you the order each treadle is used. A table loom has levers that control each shaft individually instead of treadles. What you need to do is to translate the tie-up and treadling into a lift plan so that you know which levers need to move to make each shed.

In the illustration below, the tie-up and treadling is on the left with the lift plan is on the right. If you look at the first pick in the treadling, you see that it tells you to raise treadle 3. If you look up to the tie-up, you see that treadle 3 raises Shafts 1, 2, 6, and 8. To weave this pick on a table loom, you need to pull the levers that control Shafts 1, 2, 6, and 8 to make the same shed. All other picks in the treadling are treated the same way. 

Hope this helps, 

Lynn Tedder

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Anne-grethe wrote
on 16 Apr 2012 9:51 AM

THANK YOU SO MUCH LYNN !! This makes so much sense.  I knew that it had to be simple. It was the direction I was going but couldn't quite get there Smile

Anne

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Neal Rosen wrote
on 13 Jul 2012 4:07 PM

I am new to 8 shaft weaving as well.  I easily understood your explamation of the treadles and the top diagram on the left.  However, I don't understand the bottom left and right sections ( including the lift plan).  How do you get from the left diagram to the right.  I have been reading everything I can about drafts and i just keep getting more and more confused. Any additional explanation would be much appreciated.

 

Neal Rosen

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Lynn Tedder wrote
on 13 Jul 2012 8:51 PM

Hi Neal,

I'm happy to try to make the draft clearer. I would like to make clear that this addresses only the tie-up and treadling portions of a draft and how to translate a treadle loom's tie-up and treadling into a lift plan for a table loom. The third element of a draft, the threading, is necessary, but to use the tie-up and treadling, the loom must already have been threaded, so it is not discussed here.

I've attached a revised version of the draft I posted earlier. This one has two additional treadles (for plain weave) added to the tie-up, and I've placed the shafts into a grid that looks like (but isn't exactly) a tie-up, which usually means that . Most 8-shaft treadle looms have at least 10 treadles, but although an 8-shaft table loom will never have more than 8 levers, it is able to produce every single shed combination of the 254 different sheds that 8 shafts can produce any time. That is because each lever on a table loom controls a single shaft, and you depress as many levers as you need to make the shed. Generally, a treadle loom can only produce as many different sheds as it has treadles (there are ways around this, but they aren't germane to this discussion).

The lower sections of the draft that you have flagged  are the treadling sequence (or treadling) for the treadle loom on the left, and the actual lift plan for the table loom on the right. The treadling indicates the sequence in which the sheds are made to produce the interlacement and pattern. They are usually (but not always) read starting from the tie-up and working away, in this case, from top to bottom, and they are used in conjunction with the tie-up to make the pattern. A mark in a column of the treadling indicates which treadle needs to be depressed to make the shed at that point. Thus, to weave plain weave, you would depress treadle 1 (and raise shafts 1-3-5-7) and treadle 2 (shafts 2-4-6-8) alternately. To weave the 16 picks of the pattern repeat, you would depress the treadles in the following order (these are treadle numbers): 5-8-3-6-9-4-7-10-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10. If you look at the column in the tie-up for each treadle, you can see which shafts that treadle is going to raise. However, once the treadles are tied, you don't need to worry about them for the most part, and only need to depress the treadles in the right order.

Because the shafts on a table loom are permanently tied to their individual levers, the shed sequence needs to be presented as a lift plan instead of a tie-up and treadling. The same information is contained in the lift plan as in the tie-up and treadling, but it has been rearranged for more efficient use on a table loom. In a lift plan, you read the "treadling" sequence top to bottom like the treadling on the left, but you need to read the entire row, not just a treadle number, to know which shaft levers you need to depress to make the shed. Thus, to weave plain weave from a lift plan, you would depress levers for shafts 1,3,5, and 7 to weave the first shed, then lower them, and depress levers for shafts 2,4,6, and 8 for the second. I should add that table loom weavers are usually the ones who need to make this translation when working from published drafts, because it's easier to generate a correct tie-up and treadling than a lift plan. However, most computer drafting programs have a feature than will make this translation for you.

(The arrows pointing from the treadling to the lift plan are just to indicate that the row in the lift plan will produce exactly the same shed as the treadle in the treadling, as you will see if you compare the shafts raised by each of the treadle numbers in the left tie-up.)

I hope this clarifies things for you a bit.

Lynn Tedder

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MikkiB wrote
on 31 Dec 2013 1:06 PM

Hi Lynn, thank you very much for your clear depiction of reading a draft and relating it to a table top loom. 

Can you take this information just a little further please, I have been looking at some weaving patterns where the introduction of the book speaks of lift plans and when I look at the individual patterns they refer to specific charts in this case called (easy example chosen here) Pattern A.  Pattern A shows a two shaft pattern of what I believe is tabby - colored in squares (black white black white, on shaft 1 and the opposite on shaft 2).  Under that chart are numbers 1 2 3 4.  Now under the numbers 1 and 2 are thread colors for color sequencing, but I can't tell when to use those colors.  The actual woven fabric pictured, appears to have many weft rows of each of the two colors in wide stripes alternating the colors - say 8 rows of color 1 then 8 rows of color 2 then repeat to end of the fabric. From this diagram how do I determine what I should be doing as to the color sequencing?  Is it personal preference?

I hope I explained this well enough for you to be able to assist me.  Thank you very much

Mikki

 

edited to say I have heard from the author and in short the color squares are to be lifted so that the weft thread lays under that lifted warp thread.  And as to the color sequencing yes it is personal preference how many times to throw the colors.

I have to say I was very pleased to hear from the author and for her to have provided a very clear explanation.

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Lynn Tedder wrote
on 2 Jan 2014 9:31 AM

Hi Mikki,
I'm afraid this has me confused, too. It sounds like it is a color-and-weave pattern that uses an idiosyncratic drafting method for both the draft and the color order. I would need to see it before I can tell you how it works with any reliability. What book or resource did it come from? Or can you post a scan or other representation of the draft for me to look at?

Lynn

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MikkiB wrote
on 2 Jan 2014 9:43 AM

Thanks Lynn for responding and Happy New Year.

The book I am referring to is Color and Texture in Weaving  150 contemporary designs.  Do you have this book?  If not I am not sure how to scan and post something here.  Also am I allowed to post pics from a copy righted book here?

 

Thank you so much.

Mikki

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on 2 Jan 2014 11:42 AM

Mikki,

I ,too, have been looking through  "Color and Texture in Weaving" for inspiration.  The draft protocol used is like no other in any of my resources. A lot of "weaver's knowledge" is needed to use different resources - we are so spoiled by Handwoven, where everything is spelled out for us.  I'm not sure we are meant to copy the fabric shown in that book or just get ideas.

Happy Weaving in the New Year,  Stephany

 

 

 

 

 

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MikkiB wrote
on 2 Jan 2014 2:42 PM

Happy New Year Stephany and thank you for your response.

I sure wish I had that "weaver's knowledge" to understand what we are being told to do in that book.  Some of the patterns are pretty inspiring.

Have you been weaving long?  I took a beginner's class many years ago and just pulling out the loom recently.

 

Thanks

Mikki

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Fortin wrote
on 7 Jan 2014 9:05 AM

Hi Mikki,

Page nine of the book explains the plans and drafts.  Lift plans refer to tie-ups for treadles.  I am looking at pattern A on page 59.  The warp for this is the 3 color stripe.  It looks as tho she has it threaded on 8 shafts, but with the tabby weave, it could be on only 2, in that color order.  Under "Passion Fruit" read the pattern A from top to bottom, in this case only two repeats, first pick is raising shafts 2,4,6,8; second pick is used raising 1,3,5,7.  Again, if you want to only do tabby, this could be done on two shafts, but the author has other patterns on the same threading.  Let us look at "Grape", next page.  Pattern A is still the tabby, pattern B reads top to bottom, lift (or tie-up) pick with 1,2,7,8 lifted, then repeated, then pick with 3, 6 lifted, then 4,5 lifted and so on.  I believe the colors are just showing the colors used, the weft color order seems to be shown only in the narrow photo to the left of the large photo.  Instead of showing a tie-up for each pattern, she is showing the shafts that are lifted.  It is confusing to have the numbers under the plan, when we are supposed to read top to bottom.  If your shafts were tied separately, as in a direct tie-up, you would need multiple feet to treadle some of these and with combining the tabby with the pattern, you would need 10 treadles to do "Grape" , two for tabby and 8 for the pattern.  Plum would use 8 treadles, lifting 7 shafts at a time on each treadle, long floats on the back of the fabric!

Hope this helps,

Sarah 

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MikkiB wrote
on 7 Jan 2014 7:00 PM

Hi Sarah, thanks very much for your notes.  I will take a look at them along with the book.

 

Mikki

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MikkiB wrote
on 8 Jan 2014 4:13 PM

Hi Sarah, this is great.  Thanks very much.

 

I never saw page 9 - why I have no idea, overlooked I guess - and it is key to the patterns in the book as it's titled "About this Book" - really big clue, duh. I feel so dumb for having passed over it, however it happened.

 

You also cleared up what I'm to do when there are 8 shafts and only 2 pattern rows.  (lift 2,4,6,and 8 or 1,3,5,and 7).

 

Thank you very much for taking the time to review the book and for providing insight.

 

Mikki

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Fortin wrote
on 8 Jan 2014 6:28 PM

You are welcome!  I believe weavers from Great Britain and Europe refer to "lift plans", when we would have the tie up then the treadling sequence. Itmay be simpler this method, when producing multiple fabrics on one threading.  You can do the same, just having to change the tie up for each one, which would be simpler than having multiple feet :).  It is an interesting book, have fun with it.

 

Sarah

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